Trenton: Run off Election online forum Council candidates North Ward

Trenton-

TheTrentonpost.com online form: North Ward

Read the questions and answers below⬇️

Algernon Ward vs Marge Caldwell-Wilson

www.TheTrentonPost.com

609-310-NEWS (6397)

The Trenton post sent each of the 10 remaining candidates running in the city’s June 12, run off election a questionnaire concerning a variety of issues facing our city, and to also give us a brief description about their campaigns in 300 words or less

the candidates were given till June 2, to answer & return the questionnaire

Council candidates were given 5 questions each and mayoral candidate we’re given 8 questions to answer those answers will be published over the next several days leading up to Tuesdays June 12, 2018 city run off election

We will start with Each of the 4 Ward races North, East, West and South followed by the Mayors race which we will publish on Sunday June 10, 2018

Our first match up will feature the North ward run off where we have 2 term incumbent Marge Caldwell-Wilson going against Algernon Ward Who ran 4 years ago unsuccessfully

Below are the questions and Answers submitted by the candidates ⬇️

Algernon Ward Jr.’s Response to the Trenton Post Questions for City Council Candidates

1. What have you identified as the number one problem existing in your ward and how do you plan to fix it?

To answer this question properly, I must point out that this question is not properly framed. There is no “number one problem” that can be addressed with a single “fix”. If that was the case, the problem would already be solved. In fact, there are multiple problems that must be addressed at the same time. For example, one could easily say that jobs are the number one problem. But to attract employers, one must address the school system, crime, housing, transportation and taxes.

Each of these issues has its own challenges that can’t be dealt with in a vacuum, as one affects the others and then there is the basic question that all solutions must answer – how do you pay for it?

Using the same example of jobs, I would work with the administration to develop an aggressive marketing approach to potential businesses that we want to locate in Trenton. I also suggest that we separate the Department of Housing and Economic Development into separate departments that should give them the ability increase their focus on each area. Within the Department of Economic development, I would support an incentive program for employees that would reward them financially for successfully getting a business to locate or expand in Trenton. I would support a creative and competitive business tax regime. I will demand that City hall become more “business friendly” instead of “business bashers”. There would be little to no cost to do this.

I will advocate for a two-fold strategy to address the school system. All day schooling for children Kindergarten to 3rd grade with a special focus on literary and language skills to address our lagging test scores. This would also allow their parents to work without worrying about picking up the kids from school. For adults I will advocate for an employment oriented and flexible Adult Education and re-training program in conjunction with the area High schools and colleges. Federal ESSA Grants are available to finance both parts of this strategy.

To address Crime, a genuine Community Policing program that includes foot patrols and a Civilian Review Board needs to be established. This will provide both the citizens and businesses a sense of safety as they go about their lives. A recreation program for teens to keep them off the streets and out of gangs should be a part of the overall crime prevention program. I will emphasize here that national studies, and our own experience here in Trenton, has demonstrated that the number of Police officers does not necessarily lower the crime rate as most people believe. Effective deployment does.

Local housing conditions are another factor that relates to the creation of jobs. The rate of vacancies as a share of the total housing stock is a key indicator used to determine the capability of local housing markets to provide adequate available housing for prospective residents. Generally, a vacancy rate of around 5 percent is considered an adequate supply. Both citywide and among all of Trenton’s individual neighborhoods, the vacancy rate is more than double the 5 percent level, a sign of oversupply that may have the effect of depressing neighborhood property values and discouraging new construction if vacant units are in livable condition. While The vacancy rate of 12.9 percent in North Trenton (646 vacant units), is below the citywide rate of 13.5 percent, the number of abandoned houses in North Trenton depresses the value of neighborhood housing and are a magnet for squatters, crime and fires which jeopardizes the safety of all residents. In recent years there has been an emphasis on affordable housing construction, however a need for middle-income housing has emerged. The City’s Master Plan should be adjusted to address the need for middle-income housing. Public-Private partnerships can be leveraged to provide the funding for such housing construction initiatives, while Trenton’s own vacant property ordinance and a $13M state grant can be applied to the demolition of abandoned buildings.

Transportation is another consideration that employers take into account when they are considering where to locate their business. Trenton’s roads are sorely in need of repair, and our public transportation system is inadequate to the needs of Trenton’s residents. The loss of the $3.5M State Department of Transportation road repair grant ear-marked for Trenton due to the inability of Trenton’s Department of Public Works to properly complete the application, is simply unacceptable. While there is a hope that a waiver may yet be granted, someone needs to be held accountable for such lapses. To address the public transportation system, an improved collaboration with the Mercer County Improvement Authority who manage the busing lines, is clearly required. Since Trenton residents pay county taxes like everyone else, seeking a better return for those tax dollars is not an unreasonable expectation that is a cost-neutral solution for our public transportation system.

Of course, taxes are an important factor that a job-creating business looks at when are deciding where to locate. Obviously, Trenton’s business tax structure must be competitive with the other Mercer County municipalities. While tax abatements and Enterprise Zones play an important role in attracting business prospects, they can be over-used and result in a loss of tax revenue that must be made up somewhere else in the City’s budget. The recent city-wide re-evaluation of property taxes has had the consequence where some businesses have had their property taxes double within one year. Clearly this puts pressure on the profit margin of existing businesses and discourages new businesses from locating here. The tax appeal process for property taxes can be adjusted to be more user-friendly, and to accurately reflect the real-world value of the properties in question. This can be accomplished at no cost to taxpayers.

2. Do you have any plans to seek the reopening of the library branch in your ward? If so how would you fund the system

My plans for the North Ward does include the re-opening of its critically needed neighborhood libraries. There is currently a resolution that has been tabled in city council, that would begin to accomplish this task by the issuance of Municipal Bonds. I am in complete support of moving this resolution to passage, but if the current council does not do it, I will re-introduce it when I am elected.

3. What is your position on the continued operation of the Trenton Water Works by the City of Trenton?

Are you in favor of selling it to a private entity? Why or why not?

While it is true that there have been several recent incidents at the Trenton Water Works, I’m confident those problems can be addressed without giving up its operations. However, I do have an open mind regarding a Regional Agreement to form a Mercer County Authority with neighboring municipalities, but it would have to be part of a much larger agreement, with a wider scope, that would include roads, public safety and sanitation.

I do not support privatizing the TWW at all. In fact, I was a primary petitioner and organizer of the “Trenton NO Sale Campaign” which opposed the sale of the TWW in 2012. The reason I took that position was that the contract with the NJ American Water Company contained a provision that allowed for “quarterly billing” which would have resulted in a 400% increase in water bills, which is out of the question. With income from the TWW being the largest source of revenue in Trenton’s budget other than taxes, it would be un-wise, to say the least, for us to sell it.

4. The Trenton School System ranks at the bottom of recent surveys according to an article published in New Jersey Monthly, September 2014. What do you identify as the major factors contributing to these statistics and how should they be addressed?

It has been extensively studied and thoroughly documented that poverty has a disproportionate impact on the educational outcome of students. In 2016-17 the Trenton school district has 84% Economically Disadvantaged Students, 13% Students with Disabilities, 18% English Learners and 1% Students in Foster Care. Student enrollment by race is Hispanic 50.2%, African-American 47.3%, White 1.3%, two or more races 0.6%, Asian 0.4%, Native American 0.1%, Pacific Islanders 0.1%. Given these statistics, an emphasis on bilingual language and literacy skills instruction for English Language Learners (ELL) including Dreamers is required. This emphasis would also benefit their math scores as improved literacy helps to understand the math questions on tests. A sensitivity to the particular needs of the 84% of economically disadvantaged students is obvious. Re-opening neighborhood libraries play a critical role in providing access to computers, the internet and individual tutoring for these students when they are not in school. The effect of poverty is multi-faceted indicating that the Trenton’s school district must account for this reality when it designs it curriculum and educational programs.

The other obvious needs are, all-day school for children from Pre-school to third grade and after-school programs for working parents of older students. This approach would address a wide-spread burden on parents who work during the day and relieve them of the expense and stress of being concerned about the welfare of their children while they’re working. The need for emphasis on Kindergarten to 3rd grade literacy is borne out in the latest district performance report where more than half of 3rd graders were not reading at the 3rd grade level. As a former Trenton Board of Education Member, I was exposed to many accepted studies that indicated that if a student is reading at grade level by the 3rd grade they will benefit for the rest of their education career, but if not, they will continue to struggle.

As a City Councilperson I would lobby the education community for structural changes such as year-round schooling, the 24-hour school where adults use school facilities after-hours, for continuing education programs for re-training working adults and specialized programs for English Language Learning (ELL). Of course, the devil is in the details, fair compensation and benefits, vacations etc. are central to the success of any of these ideas. I will seek to collaborate with all the stake-holders in the Education Community, especially parents, to refine new ideas so that together, we can shape the future of education in our city.

5. Why do you consider yourself the best person for the job of Councilman or Councilwoman?

IT’S TIME FOR A CHANGE IN THE NORTH WARD

The North Ward in the city of Trenton is the largest and most diverse district in our city. While there is a lot to be proud of in our hometown, we also have our share of problems. Jobs, drugs, senior support, teen recreation, housing, and crime are all issues that cry out for an energetic effort to implement forward thinking solutions. These problems are tough, but they are not impossible. Our problems are large, but we are larger. Working together, I’m convinced that it can be done. I’m fired-up and ready to make a difference! I am committed to being involved it the solution, competent to do the complex work and courageous enough to tackle the hard problems.

I have been described as a, “dedicated member of his community who has time and time again been an outspoken proponent for the North Ward of Trenton”.  As the 1st African American Research Scientist of the New Jersey Department of Health, I can bring to bear that data driven expertise to the work on Trenton City Council.

I have earned a reputation for being a man of action and not just words. I worked to stop the privatizing of the Trenton Water Works, cleaned-up the contamination, and re-built the Martin Luther King Elementary School, installed a Police Director, served on the School Board, Zoning Board, Trenton Historical Society and Canal Banks Board that built hundreds of units of affordable housing. These are community-based efforts that have bought real, tangible, results that have made a positive difference in the lives of the people of Trenton. I believe these qualities will make me an excellent representative for the North Ward on the Trenton City Council.

Read Marge Caldwell-Wilsons answers below ⬇️

Marge Caldwell-Wilson

Answers to Trenton Post Questionnaire

 

Statement on my campaign for North Ward Council

I believe that my reputation fighting for the taxpayers of Trenton’s North Ward is influenced by my past experience as a professional working woman, and is reflected in my campaign platform.

As a proud union member, and former President the Communication Workers of America Local 1087, I know what it means to work hard and fight for what I believe in. When presented with any issue that comes before the City Council, I first ask myself how my vote will affect the taxpayers and hard-working families in my ward.

I am proud to have been a member of the Women Who Mean Business Association, a graduate of Trenton Citizens Police Academy, past President of the Trenton Council of Civic Associations and to have been appointed to Governor Jim McGreevy’s Human Services transition team.

My platform consists of six points, all of which I feel will make the lives of the residents of Trenton’s North Ward better, prouder, and, most importantly, safer.

•         Demanding better security in high crime areas

•         Ensuring safe drinking water

•         Holding absentee landlords accountable for neglected and vacant properties

•         Working to reopen the North Ward Library

•         Offering bi-lingual training for all city departments

•         Controlling reckless spending

I believe that a vote for me is a vote for a stronger North Ward. I ask for your vote when you go to the polls on Tuesday, June 12 and remember to select row #1.

1. What have you identified as the number one problem existing in your ward and how do you plan to fix it?

Public safety is the number one issue facing all of us who live in Trenton. That’s true regardless of which ward you live in. We all have been faced with the tragedy of a failed system that literally leaves our lives at greater risk.

Last month, a drive by shooting happened near a park where a baseball team that I sponsor was playing. There were no police around. I demanded a meeting with our police department, who agreed to station police wagons to protect children playing sports at our parks. The police needed to reorganize in order to cover these ball games. In the end, the police director agreed because of the public pressure I helped guide.

This is an example of how we as a community need to redirect our police department to focus on community policing. We need face-to-face contact, not just squad cars driving by and speaking to us through a microphone from inside the car. Roll call needs to include information from members of our community, because we need to build trust between our police officers and the community they serve.

Frankly, we all know that communication is lacking. We need to learn to trust one another and to work together to develop a community agenda which includes foot patrols and, most importantly, face-to-face contact. Our officers and our community leaders should know each other by name and by face.

I have the utmost respect for police officers who put their lives on the line to protect us. But I believe there needs to be an honest examination of how police leadership and community members work together to address high crime areas. Perhaps we need a new police director who has experience in community policing. That will be a decision for our new mayor to make, with the guidance of those of us who are elected to serve on City Council as representatives of our community.

2. Do you have any plans to seek the reopening of the library branch in your ward? If so, how would you fund the system?

The North Ward Library was located in an old mansion that was donated to the city of Trenton. The library offered vaccines, acted as a community center, and most importantly, provided our children with a safe space after school. Mayor Tony Mack closed the North Ward Library when Governor Christie took 23 million dollars from Trenton’s budget.

Now neglected and in need of repairs, the North Ward Library is a sad reminder that elections have consequences, sometimes dire ones that we can’t begin to predict.

Too often, stress at home and unsupervised after school hours leave our children at risk. In my related experience as a social worker, I have seen firsthand how a library acts as a safe haven for kids, who thirst for the luxury of learning without being disturbed. And in the hours after school and during the summer, a library can provide at risk children with an adult to talk to.

That’s why I didn’t wait for election season to begin work on reopening our library. Since our library was closed, I have studied how in other cities, public-private partnerships with financial institutions and private foundations have been successful in providing funding for libraries just like ours.

This past year, I have been working with the East Trenton Collaborative (ETC) and other non-profit groups who restore public properties with the aid of available grant money. Our goal is to open the North Ward Library as a library and community center for children and adults to enjoy.

We hope the newly elected mayor will be willing to extend a lease to ETC so that we might fund and run our new library. It’s my belief, and the belief of so many of us in the North Ward, that reopening the library might truly reduce crime by providing safe after school programs for our youth.

3. What is your position on the continued operation of the Trenton Water Works by the City of Trenton? Are you in favor of selling it to a private entity? Why or why not?

 

As an active supporter of the 2010 referendum to keep Trenton Water Works under our control, I remain opposed to any efforts to privatize our water supply.

I view clean and safe water as a right of all Trenton residents. We should not sell this asset to the highest bidder. And because we have a responsibility to ensure that Trenton Water Works is doing the best by our taxpayers, we do need to recognize that current operations need to be upgraded.

Currently, our water supply falls under the direction of Trenton’s Public Works Department. Unfortunately, the Director of Public Works does not have the certifications required to run such a vital operation. This is too important to ignore when solutions are available.

This situation has resulted in unacceptable red tape that unnecessarily puts our residents at risk. Many residents don’t realize that before a boil water order can be issued, we must first seek approval from both the DEP and EPA, which can take hours. This is a direct result of the previous administrations failing to take the safety of our water supply seriously.

That’s why I will propose an overhaul of the structure our city departments, in order to consolidate department like Recreation and Human Services in order to create a Water and Sewer Department, headed by a Director who is certified and qualified to provide our taxpayers with the clean, safe water that they deserve.

4. The Trenton School System ranks at the bottom of recent surveys according to an article published in New Jersey Monthly, September 2014. What do you identify as the major factors contributing to these statistics and how should they be addressed?

First of all, I am grateful that my work on behalf of our children and schools has been recognized by the Trenton Education Association and that I have received the endorsement of the New Jersey Education Association.

Members of Trenton’s City Council have little direct say when it comes to Trenton’s school system. But we do hold power when it comes to spending. Used effectively, this power can give us the ability to demand better policies that will improve the education opportunities and safety of the children we represent.

Reckless spending has a direct impact on our ability to provide our children with a better education. Impact of reckless spending on our community is that so much debt means we can’t provide our community with needed resources, like better school equipment and after school programs.

That’s why I have used my position to call for increased oversight of cabinet members who serve our mayor, as well as to demand accountability before approving any new bond ordinances. As we have seen too often, the mayor is only as good as the people he or she hires. The new administration must come to table with council to resolve these issues and provide sunshine where past administrations have hidden behind shadows.

It takes experience to understand the ins and outs of our city government. I look forward to guiding my newly elected fellow City Council members on how we can effectively demand change of our new administration. Our children deserve better, and I believe it is up to us to provide the leadership needed to ensure they are given everything they need to flourish.

5. Why do you consider yourself the best person for the job of Councilman or Councilwoman?

 

I believe that my reputation as a no-nonsense representative, accountable only to the constituents that I serve, makes me the best candidate for the North Ward’s representative on Trenton’s City Council.

As your representative, I’m not afraid to speak the truth. I’m a hard-working woman, an immigrant to this great nation, and a fighter for values I believe in. That’s why my answers are always direct and honest. That’s why I earn the trust of those I have the honor of representing.

My experience as the North Ward’s fiscal watchdog, demanding accountability to eliminate reckless spending, will make me an invaluable leader to help guide my fellow newly elected Council members in ways to effect real change in our beloved city.

My understanding of the ins and outs of local government, as well as my expertise navigating the red tape at City Hall, will continue to allow me to provide my constituents with the best possible services. I’m the only Council Member who has her cell phone number, (609) 815-5584, posted on Trenton’s website, and I ALWAYS return phone calls.

I believe that a vote for me is a vote for a stronger North Ward. I ask for your vote when you go to the polls on Tuesday, June 12 and remember to select row #1.

Marge Caldwell-Wilson

Answers to Trenton Post Questionnaire

 

Statement on my campaign for North Ward Council

I believe that my reputation fighting for the taxpayers of Trenton’s North Ward is influenced by my past experience as a professional working woman, and is reflected in my campaign platform.

As a proud union member, and former President the Communication Workers of America Local 1087, I know what it means to work hard and fight for what I believe in. When presented with any issue that comes before the City Council, I first ask myself how my vote will affect the taxpayers and hard-working families in my ward.

I am proud to have been a member of the Women Who Mean Business Association, a graduate of Trenton Citizens Police Academy, past President of the Trenton Council of Civic Associations and to have been appointed to Governor Jim McGreevy’s Human Services transition team.

My platform consists of six points, all of which I feel will make the lives of the residents of Trenton’s North Ward better, prouder, and, most importantly, safer.

•         Demanding better security in high crime areas

•         Ensuring safe drinking water

•         Holding absentee landlords accountable for neglected and vacant properties

•         Working to reopen the North Ward Library

•         Offering bi-lingual training for all city departments

•         Controlling reckless spending

I believe that a vote for me is a vote for a stronger North Ward. I ask for your vote when you go to the polls on Tuesday, June 12 and remember to select row #1.

Questions for Council: North ward

1. What have you identified as the number one problem existing in your ward and how do you plan to fix it?

Public safety is the number one issue facing all of us who live in Trenton. That’s true regardless of which ward you live in. We all have been faced with the tragedy of a failed system that literally leaves our lives at greater risk.

Last month, a drive by shooting happened near a park where a baseball team that I sponsor was playing. There were no police around. I demanded a meeting with our police department, who agreed to station police wagons to protect children playing sports at our parks. The police needed to reorganize in order to cover these ball games. In the end, the police director agreed because of the public pressure I helped guide.

This is an example of how we as a community need to redirect our police department to focus on community policing. We need face-to-face contact, not just squad cars driving by and speaking to us through a microphone from inside the car. Roll call needs to include information from members of our community, because we need to build trust between our police officers and the community they serve.

Frankly, we all know that communication is lacking. We need to learn to trust one another and to work together to develop a community agenda which includes foot patrols and, most importantly, face-to-face contact. Our officers and our community leaders should know each other by name and by face.

I have the utmost respect for police officers who put their lives on the line to protect us. But I believe there needs to be an honest examination of how police leadership and community members work together to address high crime areas. Perhaps we need a new police director who has experience in community policing. That will be a decision for our new mayor to make, with the guidance of those of us who are elected to serve on City Council as representatives of our community.

2. Do you have any plans to seek the reopening of the library branch in your ward? If so, how would you fund the system?

The North Ward Library was located in an old mansion that was donated to the city of Trenton. The library offered vaccines, acted as a community center, and most importantly, provided our children with a safe space after school. Mayor Tony Mack closed the North Ward Library when Governor Christie took 23 million dollars from Trenton’s budget.

Now neglected and in need of repairs, the North Ward Library is a sad reminder that elections have consequences, sometimes dire ones that we can’t begin to predict.

Too often, stress at home and unsupervised after school hours leave our children at risk. In my related experience as a social worker, I have seen firsthand how a library acts as a safe haven for kids, who thirst for the luxury of learning without being disturbed. And in the hours after school and during the summer, a library can provide at risk children with an adult to talk to.

That’s why I didn’t wait for election season to begin work on reopening our library. Since our library was closed, I have studied how in other cities, public-private partnerships with financial institutions and private foundations have been successful in providing funding for libraries just like ours.

This past year, I have been working with the East Trenton Collaborative (ETC) and other non-profit groups who restore public properties with the aid of available grant money. Our goal is to open the North Ward Library as a library and community center for children and adults to enjoy.

We hope the newly elected mayor will be willing to extend a lease to ETC so that we might fund and run our new library. It’s my belief, and the belief of so many of us in the North Ward, that reopening the library might truly reduce crime by providing safe after school programs for our youth.

3. What is your position on the continued operation of the Trenton Water Works by the City of Trenton? Are you in favor of selling it to a private entity? Why or why not?

As an active supporter of the 2010 referendum to keep Trenton Water Works under our control, I remain opposed to any efforts to privatize our water supply.

I view clean and safe water as a right of all Trenton residents. We should not sell this asset to the highest bidder. And because we have a responsibility to ensure that Trenton Water Works is doing the best by our taxpayers, we do need to recognize that current operations need to be upgraded.

Currently, our water supply falls under the direction of Trenton’s Public Works Department. Unfortunately, the Director of Public Works does not have the certifications required to run such a vital operation. This is too important to ignore when solutions are available.

This situation has resulted in unacceptable red tape that unnecessarily puts our residents at risk. Many residents don’t realize that before a boil water order can be issued, we must first seek approval from both the DEP and EPA, which can take hours. This is a direct result of the previous administrations failing to take the safety of our water supply seriously.

That’s why I will propose an overhaul of the structure our city departments, in order to consolidate department like Recreation and Human Services in order to create a Water and Sewer Department, headed by a Director who is certified and qualified to provide our taxpayers with the clean, safe water that they deserve.

4. The Trenton School System ranks at the bottom of recent surveys according to an article published in New Jersey Monthly, September 2014. What do you identify as the major factors contributing to these statistics and how should they be addressed?

First of all, I am grateful that my work on behalf of our children and schools has been recognized by the Trenton Education Association and that I have received the endorsement of  the New Jersey Education Association.

Members of Trenton’s City Council have little direct say when it comes to Trenton’s school System. But we do hold power when it comes to spending. Used effectively, this power can gives us the ability to demand better policies that will improve the education opportunities and safety of the children we represent.

Reckless spending has a direct impact on our ability to provide our children with a better education. Impact of reckless spending on our community is that so much debt means we can’t provide our community with needed resources, like better school equipment and after school programs.

That’s why I have used my position to call for increased oversight of cabinet members who serve our mayor, as well as to demand accountability before approving any new bond ordinances. As we have seen too often, the mayor is only as good as the people he or she hires. The new administration must come to table with council to resolve these issues and provide sunshine where past administrations have hidden behind shadows.

It takes experience to understand the ins and outs of our city government. I look forward to guiding my newly elected fellow City Council members on how we can effectively demand change of our new administration. Our children deserve better, and I believe it is up to us to provide the leadership needed to ensure they are given everything they need to flourish.

First of all, I am grateful that my work on behalf of our children and schools has been recognized by the Trenton Education Association and that I have received the endorsement of the New Jersey Education Association.

Members of Trenton’s City Council have little direct say when it comes to Trenton’s school system. But we do hold power when it comes to spending. Used effectively, this power can give us the ability to demand better policies that will improve the education opportunities and safety of the children we represent.

5. Why do you consider yourself the best person for the job of Councilman or Councilwoman?

 

I believe that my reputation as a no-nonsense representative, accountable only to the constituents that I serve, makes me the best candidate for the North Ward’s representative on Trenton’s City Council.

As your representative, I’m not afraid to speak the truth. I’m a hard-working woman, an immigrant to this great nation, and a fighter for values I believe in. That’s why my answers are always direct and honest. That’s why I earn the trust of those I have the honor of representing.

My experience as the North Ward’s fiscal watchdog, demanding accountability to eliminate reckless spending, will make me an invaluable leader to help guide my fellow newly elected Council members in ways to effect real change in our beloved city.

My understanding of the ins and outs of local government, as well as my expertise navigating the red tape at City Hall, will continue to allow me to provide my constituents with the best possible services. I’m the only Council Member who has her cell phone number, (609) 815-5584, posted on Trenton’s website, and I ALWAYS return phone calls.

I believe that a vote for me is a vote for a stronger North Ward. I ask for your vote when you go to the polls on Tuesday, June 12 and remember to select row #1.

On Sunday, June 10 in our election editorial the Trenton post will publish it’s recommendations for council

To advertise with the Trenton post call 609-310-6397

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